Tag Archives: book marketing

Guerrilla Publishing – a year’s worth of book marketing support for $39 a month

This week I’m launching my new program, Guerrilla Publishing – which I’ve built over the last year while travelling full-time. I made a free “Bookselling Bootcamp” challenge while staying at the 5 star Regent Hotel Montenegro (I wanted to be comfortable going into Nanowrimo, and I also did a 2-week sugar fast). But I realized I hadn’t published anything on my …

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The Death of Book Promotion

There are some interesting discussions that are happening right now. I’m going to massively paraphrase the situation as I understand it, without naming any of the main players involved.     The story goes like this: Some people are cheating by uploading large collections of recycled content and getting people to click through to the end of the book, or …

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How I used giveaways to run the greatest book launch of all time (1000+ reviews, 100K downloads, starting from zero platform).

Full disclosure: I wrote the title of this post in 2015, before I’d actually published any fiction, so 1000 reviews and 100K downloads was my intended outcome, the biggest goal I could dream off. That said, a year and a half later, I’ve gotten far more than 100K downloads (194179, to be exact) and do have over 1000 reviews – but …

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The really weird tricks I use to write and publish bestselling books

Recently I realized my whole process for publishing bestselling books is completely backwards. At a party in Medellin recently, a guy said “wow, you’ve hacked publishing!”  I don’t like being called a hack because there’s an assumption that it means I’m putting out poor quality books to trick or fool readers.  (Steven Pressfield calls anyone who writes for an audience the …

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ALL self-publishing is a SCAM. It’s “impossible” to earn any money!

The title of this post is tongue-in-cheek, but it highlights an important issue. A lot of authors have been burned by predatory publishing companies, marketing firms or services promising the world and delivering little. Usually, authors spend way too much on their first book and see no results, then spend two years figuring out what went wrong, before finally learning …

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